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Anti-keylogger Plugin for Internet Explorer

August 21st, 2006

Amid the recent slew of news of identity thieves worming into our computers with spyware and malware to copy our keystrokes to steal our vital information, here comes some bright news for users of Microsoft Internet Explorer: A browser plugin named KeyScrambler was released by OFX Software, a startup based in Ormond Beach, Florida.

The new anti-keylogging tool takes only a minute to download. It is an invaluable addition to the IE users’ computing security for it protects all login pages, not just one or two sites, and it does so by encrypting (or “scrambling”) the user’s keystrokes at the kernel driver level, before keyloggers can record them.

QFX Software Corporation believes in user empowerment and has developed several innovative software programs since 2002 to help combat Internet fraud and identity theft, KeyScrambler being the latest of the company’s innovations. Because traditional anti-spyware and anti-virus programs typically depend on having a known signature of a keylogger before they can detect and remove it, the traditional way of combating keyloggers are ineffective in that they often work after the keyloggers have already stolen the users’ information. KeyScrambler employs a radically different method that works against known and unknown keyloggers. By encrypting the keystrokes at the kernel driver level and decrypting them within the browser itself, KeyScrambler gives keyloggers only indecipherable, encrypted keys to record.

Having KeyScrambler on your computer does not require you to do anything differently. When you type in your user names and passwords, you’ll see KeyScrambler encrypting live, unobtrusively, right before your eyes, on your screen, for your peace of mind.

The Personal edition is free for download at the company’s website and protects all logins against keyloggers. The Professional edition of KeyScrambler provides complete input protection by encrypting everything a user types into a web page, including account numbers, credit card numbers, addresses and phone numbers, and even email messages.

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